How to Stop the Drug War: What It Is and How to Make a Difference

I got my license to practice medicine.

My name is Dr. Diane Loy.

And I’m here to tell you that the drug war has become one of the greatest crises of our time.

And if you think about it, the drug wars have been going on for centuries.

You know, for centuries the United States has been a nation of laws and laws have been a source of power.

They’ve been a way of life.

They’re used to control things.

But the drug laws of the 1800s were created to control and punish.

And that’s not what we’re talking about here.

We’re talking more about a drug war that is killing people.

That’s what this is about.

So the people of the United Kingdom have been suffering, their lives have been ruined.

And they are not going to go back to being a country that is a law-abiding society.

They are going to be the lawless society.

And so, I want to tell them that they have to have faith in their ability to live together in a society that is based on the rule of law.

Because this is a war on the poor.

This is a crime against humanity.

This war on drugs is not about drugs.

This drug war is about the rule, on a system of exploitation and domination.

And when people have been robbed, when their lives and their futures have been destroyed by drugs, it is time for the world to stop fighting over drugs.

And it’s time to get back to the law.

That is what the Lords and Commons will be discussing this evening, and we can all get involved.

I want you to have this message: It is time to stop the drug policy war.

We must get back on track.

I know that this war on poverty and on people’s rights has been going around for centuries, but it is not going away.

It’s only been going up because of the drug-war policies of this administration.

And this is the time that the world is finally going to get it right.

But it’s not going in a direction that is going to make us safer.

And we’re not going there.

We have to take a different direction.

So I want the Lords, the Commons, the people to join me tonight and say to Donald Trump, Donald Trump: Stop the war on drug.

Let’s start to work together.

Let us stop this war.

Let the people have control of our country.

Let them have faith and they can live in a country where they can make their own decisions about their lives.

Let me be clear.

I am not saying that we should be treating people as criminals.

We shouldn’t.

But if we’re going to treat people as human beings, we have to respect human dignity and human rights.

And the human dignity of every human being, the human rights of every person, is the foundation of our civilization.

It is what has made us great.

It has given us the capacity to create the greatest achievements of the human race.

So if you want to make your country great again, then you have to start by making sure that you respect human rights, and that you have the will and the capacity.

Thank you.

(Applause.)

[Applauded.]

Let me go back now to a message from our colleague in the House of Lords, Lord St John of Salisbury.

Lord St. John, let me tell you, Lord Trump has not been wrong.

He’s been wrong about drugs, and he has been wrong in the wrong ways.

So he has to be told again and again: This is wrong.

This policy has to change.

Let you be clear: The drugs are not the problem.

The drugs do not have a negative impact on the quality of life of the people in Britain.

The drug war needs to change and we must be a leader in this.

So we have a chance to be a force for good in the world, and this is why the Lords will be debating tonight.

Let it be a moment to recommit to the rule and the law and to our duty to respect the human values of our people.

Thank your Lordships.

I yield back the balance of my time.

I thank the Speaker.

The Speaker will now consider an order.

[The order is as follows:] A joint statement on the future of the Department of Health and Social Care and the health and social care and social security departments of the UK Government.

The Secretary of State for Health, Michael Gove, will chair the joint statement.

The House rises, as follows: The House of Commons has passed an amendment to the Health and Care Bill to repeal the Drugs and Crime Act 1986 and replace it with a Health and Security Bill.

The amendment, which was put by Lord Rennie, was tabled by Lord St Ann of Salmo in the Dorset House of Delegates.

Lord Rannie is the former Chief Constable of Bedford