Which deities are the most likely to appear in your favorite movies?

With so many deities around the world, it’s easy to forget about some of the more obscure ones, like the goddess of death or the God of War.

Here’s our pick for the top 10.

1.

Aesop’s Fables God of Love, the Father of Animals and the Goddess of Truth, is often referred to as the god of love, but according to mythology, he was born a shepherd.

A giant goat named Zeus was also worshipped in Greek mythology, and in the Greek language he was also called Aesopus, meaning “the lover of gods.”

His name was also used in other ancient languages as a verb, which means to love.

A couple of different versions of the myth have the gods being lovers of each other, but in the oldest versions of Aesope’s Fable, Zeus becomes the father of all animals, including goats, pigs, and the like.

In another version of the story, the gods are brothers who are lovers of one another.

They fight over a goat that was supposed to be Zeus’s, and Zeus falls and breaks his hand.

Zeus is saved from drowning by his brother-in-law Poseidon.

It was this story that inspired the biblical story of Augean stables, where Zeus and the gods would sleep in the middle of the sea.

Augeans were also believed to be the source of all life on earth.

2.

The Hindu God of Justice and Wisdom The Hindu god Vishnu, who is sometimes referred to simply as “the Father of Wisdom,” is known for his benevolence and wisdom.

Vishnu is considered the creator of the universe and the father god of all the gods.

Vishneetha, Vishnu’s wife, was also a protector of mankind, and her love for humans, along with her beauty, caused the gods to worship her.

Vishnushu was also believed by Hindus to have an erotic love affair with the goddess Saraswati.

3.

The Egyptian God of Life and Death A great deal of myth and legend revolves around the god Ra, who in ancient Egypt was known as “Ra.”

His godly nature was associated with the Nile, which was thought to have been the birthplace of mankind.

Ra is often associated with thunderstorms, storms that strike the sky with lightning, and earthquakes.

Ra was also known to create the gods, as well as other beings from the Underworld, and his son Horus, who was one of the seven gods who ruled over the Underworld.

Ra’s wife Isis was also associated with childbirth, which led to the belief that Ra was the father and mother of all women.

4.

The Roman God of Wisdom and Justice In ancient Rome, the Roman god Lucius was said to have married and had two sons, the first son was named Lucius.

The name Lucius meant “son of a man.”

The second son was known to be Lucius, and was also said to be a god of fortune.

His father was named Livia, and he was said not to have known his mother’s identity, leading some scholars to suggest that he was the mother of Livia’s twin brother, Caius.

Livia was believed to have taken her son Lucius away from his father and took him to live with his grandfather.

5.

The Hebrew God of Healing and Peace Many Hebrews believed that their god was the same God as Jesus Christ, who became the first incarnation of God, known as the Messiah.

The Jewish God of healing and peace was also thought to be one of God’s own sons.

When Jesus’ mother asked his father for forgiveness for his sin, Jesus replied that he would never forgive his father if he didn’t heal her wounds.

Jesus was later crucified on the cross, and it was later thought that the wound on his forehead was a wound inflicted by his father’s spear.

6.

The Chinese God of Medicine and Health A Chinese medicine legend states that when the god Zhuangzi first saw his own father, the name Zhuangzei, he knew he would die before his father.

Zhuangzis father died when he was seven years old, and at the age of 14, he saw his mother and told her he would live for as long as he could.

The legend of Zhuangzhis mother being healed by Zhuangzes father is said to represent the healing of wounds that were inflicted on her by the gods as a result of the death of her husband.

7.

The Japanese God of Fortune and Justice The Japanese god Yomawari, who first appeared in the Japanese folklore as a young boy, is thought to dwell in the land of Japan, known for its rice fields.

He is said, however, to have lived far from Japan, and only recently was brought back to the land to find the rice fields to his liking.

This is because of the god Yozora, who has a special place in the history of Japan.

Yozoras ancestors were originally Japanese fishermen and